Islamic Feminists, Islamist Women, and the Women Between


Through a BEI grant this project convened an international working group of experts on feminism, Islamism, and a variety of Muslim communities in Europe and the Middle East to explore the divergences and points of contact between the flourishing work of “Islamic feminists” and the locally appealing political work of those who might best be called “Islamist women.” The workshop, held January 18-19, 2013, at the Columbia Global Centers-Europe in Paris, was a pilot project of “Women Creating Change,” a global initiative of the Center for the Critical Analysis of Social Difference. The organizers aimed to pioneer responsible ways of establishing scholarly networks through Columbia’s Global Centers in Paris, Istanbul, and Amman. “Women Creating Change” focuses on the effects on women of contemporary global problems, and the role of women in addressing those problems and devising strategies for political, social, and cultural transformation.

Faculty organizers:
Lila Abu-Lughod, Joseph L. Buttenwieser Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies
Katherine Pratt Ewing, Professor of Religion
Anupama Rao, Associate Professor of History

Workshop participants:
Lila Abu-Lughod, Columbia University
Attiya Ahmad, George Washington University
Zahra Ali, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris
Katherine Ewing, Religion, Columbia University
Nilüfer Göle, Sociology, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales
Havva Guney-Reubenacker, Harvard University
Nacira Guénif-Souilamas, Université Paris-Nord
Annelies Moors, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
Islah Jad, Director, Birzeit University, Palestine
Ziba Mir Hosseini, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
Anupama Rao, Barnard College
Zakia Salime, Rutgers University
Catherine Sameh, Barnard Center for Research on Women
Nadja-Christina Schneider, Humboldt University
Sa’diyya Shaikh, University of Cape Town
Gökçe Yurdakul, Humboldt University
Sponsored by the Blinken European Institute and the Center for the Study of Social Difference

Through a BEI grant this project convened an international working group of experts on feminism, Islamism, and a variety of Muslim communities in Europe and the Middle East to explore the divergences and points of contact between the flourishing work of “Islamic feminists” and the locally appealing political work of those who might best be called “Islamist women.” The workshop, held January 18-19, 2013, at the Columbia Global Centers-Europe in Paris, was a pilot project of “Women Creating Change,” a global initiative of the Center for the Critical Analysis of Social Difference. The organizers aimed to pioneer responsible ways of establishing scholarly networks through Columbia’s Global Centers in Paris, Istanbul, and Amman. “Women Creating Change” focuses on the effects on women of contemporary global problems, and the role of women in addressing those problems and devising strategies for political, social, and cultural transformation.

Faculty organizers:
Lila Abu-Lughod, Joseph L. Buttenwieser Professor of Anthropology and Gender Studies
Katherine Pratt Ewing, Professor of Religion
Anupama Rao, Associate Professor of History

Workshop participants:
Lila Abu-Lughod, Columbia University
Attiya Ahmad, George Washington University
Zahra Ali, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris
Katherine Ewing, Religion, Columbia University
Nilüfer Göle, Sociology, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales
Havva Guney-Reubenacker, Harvard University
Nacira Guénif-Souilamas, Université Paris-Nord
Annelies Moors, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
Islah Jad, Director, Birzeit University, Palestine
Ziba Mir Hosseini, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
Anupama Rao, Barnard College
Zakia Salime, Rutgers University
Catherine Sameh, Barnard Center for Research on Women
Nadja-Christina Schneider, Humboldt University
Sa’diyya Shaikh, University of Cape Town
Gökçe Yurdakul, Humboldt University
Sponsored by the Blinken European Institute and the Center for the Study of Social Difference