States of Division: Borders and Boundary-Formation in the Cold War and Beyond


Date: Apr 07, 2015

Speakers:
Charles Armstrong, Professor of History, Columbia University: Divided Nations in an Integrated World
Sagi Schaefer, Assistant Professor of History, Tel Aviv University: The Cold War and the History of Bordering in Germany
George Gavrilis, Visiting Scholar, Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life, Columbia University: Breaking Borders

Chair:
Mark Mazower, Professor of History, Columbia University

This panel brings together experts on historical and current border and conflict zones in Asia, Europe and the Middle East. The aim is to bring processes of bordering, the areas in which borders come to be, and the agencies, practices, and populations involved in such developments to the center of discussion. Paying attention to the processes of bordering and division in their local contexts, rather than as by-products of global conflicts determined by major powers, uncovers the huge difference between setting borders on maps or in treaties and actually being able to police and enforce borders on a daily basis. In studying historical and current conflicts and assessing their consequences, it is therefore at least as important to consider the levels at which such borders can be maintained in practice as it is to determine where exactly the lines were drawn.

Co-sponsored by the European Institute, the Heyman Center for the Humanities, and the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE), and the Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life (IRCPL).

Date: Apr 07, 2015

Speakers:
Charles Armstrong, Professor of History, Columbia University: Divided Nations in an Integrated World
Sagi Schaefer, Assistant Professor of History, Tel Aviv University: The Cold War and the History of Bordering in Germany
George Gavrilis, Visiting Scholar, Institute for Religion, Culture, and Public Life, Columbia University: Breaking Borders

Chair:
Mark Mazower, Professor of History, Columbia University

This panel brings together experts on historical and current border and conflict zones in Asia, Europe and the Middle East. The aim is to bring processes of bordering, the areas in which borders come to be, and the agencies, practices, and populations involved in such developments to the center of discussion. Paying attention to the processes of bordering and division in their local contexts, rather than as by-products of global conflicts determined by major powers, uncovers the huge difference between setting borders on maps or in treaties and actually being able to police and enforce borders on a daily basis. In studying historical and current conflicts and assessing their consequences, it is therefore at least as important to consider the levels at which such borders can be maintained in practice as it is to determine where exactly the lines were drawn.

Co-sponsored by the European Institute, the Heyman Center for the Humanities, and the Interdisciplinary Center for Innovative Theory and Empirics (INCITE), and the Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life (IRCPL).

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