Republic and Empire: Rethinking the Categories


Date: Apr 03, 2009 - Apr 04, 2009

Organized by Jean L. Cohen

Friday, April 3

9:30-11:30 am: Republican Thought and Empire
Phillip Petit: Republican Theory and the Temptation of Empire
Matthias Lutz-Bachmann: State Commonwealth and Power
Rainer Forst: A Republican Conceptions of Human Rights
Commentator: Andreas Kalyvas

11:45 am-1:45 pm: The State System and Empire: Historical Perspectives: Alternatives or Interwoven?
Benedict Kingsbury: Punishment of States and Peoples in the Law of War
Nehal Bhuta: Mapping the Shifting Geology of Sovereignty: Emergencies, Interventions and State Building in the 1990s
Commentator: Karuna Mantegna

3:15-5:15 pm: U.S. Republicanism and the Imperial Example
Anders Stephanson: Second Thoughts on “American Empire”
Robin Blackburn: Empire, Slave Emancipation and Human Rights
Commentator: Eric Foner

5.30pm-7.30pm: Plenary Friday Evening: Republic and Empire: The U.S.A. Today
Bruce Ackerman: The Imperial Presidency in an Age of Terror
Commentator: Andrew Arato

Saturday, April

9.30-11.00 pm: French and Turkish Republicanism and Imperial Logics
Pierre Rosanvallon: The Impossible Imperial Citizenship
Ayse Kadioglu: The Pathologies of Turkish Republican Laicism
Commentator: Nadia Urbinati

11.30 am-1.15 pm: Israel: A Late Republic and Internal Empire
Yoav Peled: Israel 1967: The Onset of Empire and the Decline of Republicanism
Amal Jamal: Ethnic Republicanism and the Logic of Exclusive Expansionism: Theoretical Conclusions from Israeli Politics
Commentator: Nida Alahmad

3.00 pm-5.15 pm: The Contemporary Conundrum Sovereign Equality, Global Constitutionalism and/or Empire
Anthony Anghie: Constitutionalism, Empire and International Economic law
James Tully: Informal Imperialism and the Res Publica
Jose Alvarez: Contemporary International Law: Empire of Law or Law of Empire?
Commentator: Jean Cohen

Co-sponsored by the European Institute, Center for Law and Philosophy, Institute for Social Research and Policy, University Seminars, Department of Political Science, and Society of Fellows in the Humanities

Date: Apr 03, 2009 - Apr 04, 2009

Organized by Jean L. Cohen

Friday, April 3

9:30-11:30 am: Republican Thought and Empire
Phillip Petit: Republican Theory and the Temptation of Empire
Matthias Lutz-Bachmann: State Commonwealth and Power
Rainer Forst: A Republican Conceptions of Human Rights
Commentator: Andreas Kalyvas

11:45 am-1:45 pm: The State System and Empire: Historical Perspectives: Alternatives or Interwoven?
Benedict Kingsbury: Punishment of States and Peoples in the Law of War
Nehal Bhuta: Mapping the Shifting Geology of Sovereignty: Emergencies, Interventions and State Building in the 1990s
Commentator: Karuna Mantegna

3:15-5:15 pm: U.S. Republicanism and the Imperial Example
Anders Stephanson: Second Thoughts on “American Empire”
Robin Blackburn: Empire, Slave Emancipation and Human Rights
Commentator: Eric Foner

5.30pm-7.30pm: Plenary Friday Evening: Republic and Empire: The U.S.A. Today
Bruce Ackerman: The Imperial Presidency in an Age of Terror
Commentator: Andrew Arato

Saturday, April

9.30-11.00 pm: French and Turkish Republicanism and Imperial Logics
Pierre Rosanvallon: The Impossible Imperial Citizenship
Ayse Kadioglu: The Pathologies of Turkish Republican Laicism
Commentator: Nadia Urbinati

11.30 am-1.15 pm: Israel: A Late Republic and Internal Empire
Yoav Peled: Israel 1967: The Onset of Empire and the Decline of Republicanism
Amal Jamal: Ethnic Republicanism and the Logic of Exclusive Expansionism: Theoretical Conclusions from Israeli Politics
Commentator: Nida Alahmad

3.00 pm-5.15 pm: The Contemporary Conundrum Sovereign Equality, Global Constitutionalism and/or Empire
Anthony Anghie: Constitutionalism, Empire and International Economic law
James Tully: Informal Imperialism and the Res Publica
Jose Alvarez: Contemporary International Law: Empire of Law or Law of Empire?
Commentator: Jean Cohen

Co-sponsored by the European Institute, Center for Law and Philosophy, Institute for Social Research and Policy, University Seminars, Department of Political Science, and Society of Fellows in the Humanities

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